Through the MCDM

November 3, 2009

A Whole New World

Filed under: com597b — Tags: , , — captainchunk @ 1:28 pm

(seems like a good idea to start a blog posting with a Disney reference from my youth, of which I apparently have become completely detached.)

I was really surprised by the article describing the streaming habits of young children. Most of which revolved around me puzzling over how a two-year old streams content from the internet. I can only imagine that:

  • I have no experience with modern day children
  • Children are far more advanced that I realize
  • The study threw two-year olds in there to grab attention
  • Hannah Montana has more power and influence than any single person should have

I’m pretty sure all of those are truthful to some extent. Strange times.

Maybe children flocking to the internet are more of a testament to the power of the medium to entertain. If you were to ask me, as Drew did, to think about “if the currency of storytelling is text, where do pictures come in?” I would reply, “they close the sale. They are the marketing, the flash, the bling, les accoutrements. Images can add a layer over the text that provides something new and exciting.”

Audubon's Carolina Parrot. If you're selling Carolina Parrots, I'm buying.

This is a fantastic example of what images can add to a story. You can describe a Carolina Parrot to me all you want, and that certainly helps in my understanding the Carolina Parrot, but you show me this, and your information just turned into a story. Images are powerful, as they directly impact one of our five main senses. Images can be used to tell any story.

One of Muybridge's experiments

Most images are either static or strung together to make movies, but the internet really changes how images can be used in a story. You don’t need to have somebody else cobble images together for a story. The experience can be created by the user. I believe that is why streaming is more popular among young children as they can develop their own stories using images, videos, books, and any other media available. The internet offers more flexibility when it comes to implementing visuals into stories.

Advertisements

6 Comments »

  1. Excellent use of photos! šŸ˜‰
    It is interesting about the “closing of the sale” aspect of pictures. I have been known to pick up a hefty tome on the History of and, after figuring out the price, check to see if there are pictures. They do provide context that the imagination, while fertile, may need to really hook a story.

    Comment by jeffhora — November 3, 2009 @ 1:42 pm

    • Images certainly do have a different impact on our thoughts about a story. You just have to know how to use them to your advantage.

      Comment by captainchunk — November 3, 2009 @ 1:49 pm

  2. Sure images are powerful. My concern is if this power can distract the attention from the story.

    You know that a good videogame needs a good story, even if it’s simple. Just amazing graphics can be boring.

    Xx

    PD: and Radiohead survived Hanna Montana’s Rage:
    http://www.buddytv.com/articles/hannah-montana/hannah-montana-radiohead-teach-26984.aspx

    Comment by Xurxo — November 3, 2009 @ 1:45 pm

    • I don’t think all video games that are successful have a “good” story. If you look at the story in Mario games. He is just trying to save the princess. A very basic story, that isn’t anything new, but through a visual fantasy world and interactivity, the story game to life.

      Comment by captainchunk — November 4, 2009 @ 5:07 pm

  3. interesting you extend pictures to movie here in your blog.

    Comment by xiaoqiye — November 4, 2009 @ 12:05 am

  4. Nice Disney reference. I agree with your comment on the Carolina Parrot photo. No matter how descriptive the text, it’s not until I see the picture that the story really becomes complete for me.

    Comment by Nicole Siegel — November 5, 2009 @ 1:06 am


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: